Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Most Effective Communication Strategies With Various Personalities

Communication style is characterized by the way people appear (or attempt to appear) in communication, the way they tend to relate to the ones they communicate with and how their messages are typically interpreted.

Here are some examples of communication styles:

  • Specific: precise and detailed, avoiding vagueness; concrete
  • Well-reasoned: providing convincing argumentation and reasoning, persuasive
  • Confident: assured of personal or other abilities, judgment, or other qualities; confident about resources needed to succeed
  • Supportive: giving support, especially moral or emotional support, assistance; helpful, caring, encouraging, understanding, reassuring, sympathetic
  • Expressive: effectively conveying meaning or feeling; eloquent
  • Forceful: characterized by strength and power; pushy; tending to make powerful impression, authoritative; can also exhibit threatening behaviour, aggressive

Different personality types process and communicate information differently. For example, an ENFJ will communicate well with people of ENFJ, INFJ, ENFP, INFP types (i.e. all who belong to the NF group), but not necessarily communicate effectively to individuals belonging to the ST group (ESTJ, ISTJ, ESTP, ISTP). This is because the ST people process and communicate information in a sensory and logical way rather than an emotional and conceptual one. How to determine the type of another person.

Communication Styles and Personality


Preferable Communication Style

The table below summarizes what communication style would be preferable when communicating to various personality types.

With ST people:

With NT people:

  • Be specific, confident, well-reasoned
  • demonstrate immediate advantages, profit
  • provide examples; use visual aids.
  • Be specific, well-reasoned; use visual aids, diagrams
  • use concepts, theories
  • appeal to intellectual capabilities
  • give them a challenge
  • show how the problem in hand or subject of communication fits into the "big picture"

With SF people:

With NF people:

  • Be supportive, expressive, and confident
  • provide examples; demonstrate immediate advantages, profit
  • appeal to feelings and emotions
  • Be expressive, well-reasoned
  • use visual aids
  • use concepts, theories
  • appeal to their intuition
  • give them a challenge
  • show how the problem in hand or subject of communication fits into the "big picture"

 

Areas of Communication


Easy To Comprehend

The table below summarizes areas of communication (or topics) that would be relatively easy to comprehend by various groups of personality types.

By ST people:

By NT people:

  • Practices (ways of doing something)
  • Resources (means, personnel, equipment, tools, materials, money)
  • Analyses (the examination of something in detail, study of interrelationships between the details, in order to understand it or draw conclusions from it)
  • Implementation (practical realisation, ways of realisation, how things are actually carried out or accomplished)
  • Rules (rules, procedures, policies, regulations, laws) 
  • Ideas, concepts
  • Analyses (the examination of something in detail, study of interrelationships between the details, in order to understand the whole or draw conclusions from it)
  • Assessment (analysis or estimation of the characteristics, qualities or value of a thing or a person)
  • Trends
  • Reviews (expert reviews, analyst opinions)
  • Paradoxical facts (that seemingly contradict the established beliefs or practises,  that may nonetheless be true)
  • History (preceding events)
  • Future (future perspectives, outcome, how things and events may develop, consequences of actions)

By SF people:

By NF people:

  • Feelings and emotions
  • Casual chatter
  • Guesswork and premonitions (feelings of something to happen, even without a strong rationale)
  • Practices (ways of doing something)
  • Opinions and beliefs (even without a rational basis)
  • Resources (means, personnel, equipment, tools, materials, money)
  • Looks (way somebody or something appears); personal appearance, style, or fashion 
  • Ideas
  • Teachings
  • Feelings
  • Casual chatter
  • Reviews (expert reviews, analyst opinions)
  • Values
  • History (preceding events)
  • Future (future perspectives, outcome, how things and events may develop, consequences of actions)
  • Beliefs
  • Personal appearance, style, or fashion

 

Not So Easy To Comprehend

The table below summarizes areas of communication (or topics) that wouldn't be so easy to comprehend by various groups of personality types.

By ST people:

By NT people:

  • Feelings
  • Beliefs
  • Casual chatter
  • Guesswork and premonitions (feelings of something to happen without a strong rationale), gossiping
  •  
  • Subtle differences in feelings
  • Gossiping
  • No alternative, “there is only one way”

By SF people:

By NF people:

  • Analyses (the examination of something in detail, study of interrelationships between the details, in order to understand it or draw conclusions from it)
  • Theories (theoretical or scientific principles devised to explain a group of facts or phenomena, seen as distinct from actual practice)
  • Surprising facts (that seemingly contradict the established beliefs or practises,  that may nonetheless be true)
  • No alternative, “there is only one way”
  • A very detailed examination of something

Next Steps

  • Determine another person's personality 
  • Learn conflict management techniques 
  • What type of leader are you or your boss? 
  • Obtain a highly personalized, accurate analysis and career development strategies tailored to your personality. Obtain a multi-page report including:
    • Your personality type description and scoresPersonality Radar™ visually represents and summarizes strengths of the key workplace-related behavioural qualities of your personality. Click to complete your personality assessment.
    • Your personality strengths. Knowing and leveraging your personality strengths is important for career success. This section of the Career Development Profile describes distinct features of your personality such as leadership qualities, results orientation, creativity, the ability to establish effective collaboration, and so on. Use it for self-marketing. For example, you can incorporate the strengths into your resume, mention at the interview or in other appropriate situations to promote yourself.
    • Most favourable work environment. Discover the main characteristics of a work environment in which you can leverage the strong areas of your personality, be most successful, fulfilled and content.
    • Career development methods, tailored to the specifics of your personality. Using these methods may help you in career advancement.
    • Pitfalls. Like with everyone else, some of your natural personality traits may become your weaknesses or become obstacles in successful career development. These weaknesses or pitfalls typically manifest themselves when certain workplace circumstances are in place. This section describes some pitfalls related to the specifics of your personality, which you need to be aware of, as well as some useful tips to help you manage these issues.
    • Career and job change analysis. Outlines conditions and “symptoms” of when a career or a job change may be desirable, from a standpoint of personality fit. Provides job compatibility calculator to assess your current job compatibility. You can use the career and job change calculator multiple times, to assess compatibility as you move on from one position or job to another.
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